Where's the radio

A small forum, halfway up in the next block, where fans of Vic & Sade, radio's home folks, can chew the halfwit fat
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Barry Walters

Where's the radio

Post by Barry Walters »

Does it seem strange that Vic and Sade apparently didn't own a radio?
In an era when radioes were as numerous as a horse, the Gooks seemed
to get all of their outside information from the newspaper.It seems
like Vic, being a big, important, muckety-muck at the kitchenware plant could certainly have afforded one. (Unless all of his liquid assets were
tied in the purchase of lodge paraphernalia, and loans to Hank Gutstop.)
Was this a deliberate ploy on the part of Paul Rhymer, or just
coincidence?

Barry
louie johnson

RE: Where's the radio

Post by louie johnson »

That's a really interesting question!
I know Fibber McGee sometimes spoke of getting his radio fixed so he could listen to Vic and Sade, but, you're right - The Gooks never even referred to radio, much less were they involved listeners. Here are a couple of thoughts, but I must warn you in advance they won't make you want to mail your undershirt to Detroit, Michigan parcel post.
1. Maybe Rhymer just wanted to keep the Gook world a simpler, less-cluttered place.
2. One of the standout innovative characteristics of the series was the interrupted conversation. Maybe Rhymer figured that these folks were more attuned to talking to others than to listening. Very often the humor came out of the fact that they weren't listening to each other.
louie johnson

RE: Where's the radio

Post by louie johnson »

A few nights ago I was listening to "A Gross Of Gravels". At the point where Sade reveals the horror of the gift Fred Stembottom has in mind for her, Vic responds with a slightly stunned "Come over that again, Lum." I'm not a Lum and Abner fan, and I'm only guess that this must be a reference to Lum and Abner. I believe Paul Rhymer was a fan of Lum & Abner to one degree or another. This is at least one instance where the Gooks at least acknowledge the existence of radio.
Barry Walters

RE: Where's the radio

Post by Barry Walters »

That is an indirect reference to radio, and likely resulted
because of Rhymer's friendship with Norris Goff, who played Abner on
that program. Several Chicago-based radio personalities and radio
staff members are also mentioned in the run of the program, including
Goff, Dave Garroway and Homer Hecht. Goff was from Mena, Arkansas,
which also received mention several times. I did find one mention of
radio in the "audition script" of March 28, 1932 titled "Two Many
Gooks". Sade announces her mother is coming for a visit and Vic
responds without enthusiasm. When asked if he doesn't want her to
come, he replys:
"Why, sure I do. I want her to come and stay 6 months instead of 2
like she did before. I want her to use my private cream on my private
breakfast food the way she does. I want her to tune in on her favorite
radio programs all night long instead of mine. I want her to use my
tooth-paste and my magazines. I want her to tell me how to run my
business and my family and my health. Oh, sure, I want her. Want her
right now. I wish she'd hurry! I can't wait."

This script was never aired, so 'technically' there was still no
direct mention of the Gooks owning a set in those halcyon days of
radio when they were as popular as televisions of today.louie johnson wrote:
>
> A few nights ago I was listening to "A Gross Of Gravels". At
> the point where Sade reveals the horror of the gift Fred
> Stembottom has in mind for her, Vic responds with a slightly
> stunned "Come over that again, Lum." I'm not a Lum and Abner
> fan, and I'm only guess that this must be a reference to Lum
> and Abner. I believe Paul Rhymer was a fan of Lum & Abner to
> one degree or another. This is at least one instance where the
> Gooks at least acknowledge the existence of radio.
Barry Walters

RE: Where's the radio

Post by Barry Walters »

Make that Homer Heck (rather than Homer Hecht). The man who
was so poor, he didn't even own his own socks.
DBCrader
Posts: 32
Joined: Sun Nov 21, 2010 7:23 pm

Post by DBCrader »

You know... that mighta been a little too weird!!! A radio show about people sittin' around and listening to the radio!!!
DBCrader
Posts: 32
Joined: Sun Nov 21, 2010 7:23 pm

Post by DBCrader »

Add to that the fact that they only had like 12 minutes to get a show off in... they didn't have time to sit around and listen to some half-wit radio show... probably broadcasting the radio adventures of Gloria Golden and "Four-Fisted" Frank Fuddleman!!!
Jimbo
Posts: 34
Joined: Sat Dec 04, 2010 1:19 pm

Post by Jimbo »

ha! I think about V&S all the time and I never thought of a radio show with FFFF and GG. :) funny idea!
See my gallery of OTR sites: http://otrbuffet.blogspot.com
DBCrader
Posts: 32
Joined: Sun Nov 21, 2010 7:23 pm

Post by DBCrader »

Well, I hear it all the time on "When Radio Was"... some big holkywood star like Jimmy Stewart or Burt Lancaster recreating their role in a movie for a radio broadcast (Director's Playhouse?) so I see no reason why Gloria Golden and "Four-Fisted" Frank Fuddleman wouldn't show up there, from time to time...
ronrob
Posts: 3
Joined: Wed Aug 27, 2008 4:28 pm

News on the Radio

Post by ronrob »

When Paul Rhymer developed the Vic & Sade program in the early 30's radio was not the go-to source for news that it became during WWII. Anybody who grew up in North America in the second half of the 20th Century would think of radio with its News on the Hour. That was not the case in the 1930's. During that decade radio became the source of news commentary more than reporting. So people still went to the newspaper for actual "news" .. especially local news.

As to Rhymer not making mention of a radio in the "house halfway up in the next block", think of the few number of times a TV set is actually playing in the average scripted TV show. The TV is often used to move a story along, not to be playing in the background as it is in most homes ... That would simply be too confusing on the soundtrack.
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