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What was the best genre Escape handled?

Posted: Thu Jul 15, 1999 3:14 pm
by Leonard
Right now I've heard about half of the Escapes available. Escape handled action/adventure stories in many genres...war, science fiction, mystery, western, espionage, and adventure. If I had to chose a favorite subcatagory, I would have to chose war and espionage as my favorite Escape genres. The Great Impersonation, The 13th Truck, Train From Olbiefeld are three examples that come to mind. What are your favorite type of stories that Escape handled?

RE: What was the best genre Escape handled?

Posted: Sat Jul 24, 1999 12:39 pm
by Jay Meade
I think the 'general mystery' was a good format for these shows. 'The Fourth Man' and 'Three Skeleton Key' are a couple of examples in my limited listening experience.

Re: What was the best genre Escape handled?

Posted: Tue Mar 29, 2016 9:54 am
by telegonus
Leonard wrote:Right now I've heard about half of the Escapes available. Escape handled action/adventure stories in many genres...war, science fiction, mystery, western, espionage, and adventure. If I had to chose a favorite subcatagory, I would have to chose war and espionage as my favorite Escape genres. The Great Impersonation, The 13th Truck, Train From Olbiefeld are three examples that come to mind. What are your favorite type of stories that Escape handled?

I'd say that the introductions say it all, with the Mussorgsky music, Conrad's melodramatic introduction: they were best at telling adventure tales. However, there are many kinds of adventure, and Escape seem especially well suited to tales set in the tropics and at sea; and their emphasis on exotic locales is one of the many things that set them apart from (but not necessarily better than) Suspense.
  • The latter show was more stately in pacing, more genteel in tone; and they tended to tell tales with urban nor familiar American settings. Even when the suspense was ratcheted way up the series itself felt rather cozy.Escape was never cozy, which had its good and bad aspects. When it failed it often felt like much ado about nothing; however, when it succeeded it got the blood moving, the heart racing. In this it was a more modern show than most radio anthologies of its era regardless of what genre was being handled that week.